Survey finds farm confidence still faltering

Survey finds farm confidence still faltering; survey says farmers worried about weather. The survey by the Pew Research Center finds a strong majority of Americans still are worried about the weather and the environment, and concern about the current crop cycle is still highest among those who currently own natyasastra.comhomes. However, just 39 percent of the total U.S. population said the situation is favorable, down from 54 percent in 2010. Overall, the survey found that 62 percent of the nation’s farmers still said they have difficulty finding enough land for future harvest.

Pew: 61 percent of farmers don’t know how much land is available.

More: “Farmers are struggling with the current crop-cycle”

More: Pew: “Millennial farmers are worried about the growing number of crops”

“The growing number of crops this year – including sweet potatoes and potatoes with a longer tuber, in addition to other crops such as squash, tomatoes and strawberries – has increased concern among many millennials about future food security and quality,” said Tom Gewisser, Pew’s survey director. “The lack of farm confidence among some older generation farmers has been noted since the past few decades when fears of water shortages caused most farmers to close their farms for fear of the risk of becoming deli바카라nquent.”

Pew asked farmers in 2011 how worried they were about the current crop-cycle and the current climate. By more than two-to-one, farmers were especially likely to express increasing confidence about the current crop-cycle than that about the environment. Overall, the survey found that 65 percent of fa바카라rmers were at least somewhat confident in the current crop-cycle and 58 percent were more than somewhat. Meanwhile, 64 percent of farmers said they did not know how much land was available for next year’s harvest.

The survey also asked respondents how concerned they were about the current weather and the environment, including how much they were concerned about a drought or heat wave in their state of residence. By a wide margin, farmers were more likely than the general public to say they were either at least somewhat or very concerned about a drought or heat wave affecting their area. And 56 percent of farmers said their region had a severe drought or heat wave or more severe than average.

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